Angela Falcetta

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2016-2017

Degree
Ph.D., History, University of Padua, 2014
Concentration
History
Dissertation
Orthodox-Christians in the Catholic Mediterranean: Greek-rite Communities in the Eighteenth-Century Italy
Research Project
Entangled Spaces: Latin and Greek Christians During the Late Confessional Age and Beyond (18th and 19th Centuries)

Angela Falcetta earned her doctoral degree from the University of Padua (Department of Historical and Geographic Sciences and the Ancient World) in 2014. As a visiting Ph.D. student she participated in the Erasmus Program at Oxford University during the spring of 2012. She received a B.A. in History and a Master’s degree in Early Modern History from the University of Florence. She was Research Fellow at the University of Padua (October 2014-March 2016) and formerly she was awarded research grants from the Luigi Einaudi Foundation (Turin, 2009-2010) and the University of Sassari (June-September 2014). She is the author of a book (in Italian) entitled “Orthodox-Christians in the Catholic Mediterranean: boundaries, networks, communities in the Kingdom of Naples, 1700-1821”(forthcoming September 2016) and also of several papers selected for international conferences both in Italy and abroad, as well as peer-reviewed articles on different issues related to the Greek diaspora.

About the Research Project
Entangled Spaces: Latin and Greek Christians During the Late Confessional Age and Beyond (18th and 19th Centuries)

The eighteenth century is usually regarded as the period in which confession building processes, triggered both by the Greek Patriarchal Church and by Rome, resulted in an increasing estrangement between Greek and Latin Christianity. According to this historical narrative, the normative discourses on confessional identity and the provisions issued from above were to be effectively conveyed and transposed locally. This research project aims to shed fresh light on the confessionalization processes in action since the middle of the 18th century. Based on the documents stored in the Historical archive of Propaganda Fide in Rome and other primary sources, the project intends to investigate the developments in Greek-Latin relationships across the Mediterranean during this transitional period. Through a multi-local analysis, which spans from the Greek-rite settlements in Italy to the Greek East, an attempt will be made to interpret the confessionalization processes as a multifarious phenomenon resulting from the interaction between normative changes and local practices.