Anthi Andronikou

Mary Seeger O’Boyle Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2017-2018

Degree
Ph.D., Art History, University of St. Andrews, 2015
Dissertation
Italy and Cyprus: Cross-Currents in Visual Culture (Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries)
Research Project
News from a Medieval Commonwealth: Visual Culture in Southern Italy, Cyprus, and the Levant, c. 1200-1300

Anthi Andronikou has a BA (ptychion) in Art History and Archaeology from the University of Athens (2004). After completing her undergraduate studies, she undertook an MPhil in Byzantine Art History at the same institution. Anthi also holds an MLitt in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italian Art from the University of St Andrews. She  completed her PhD at St Andrews (2015) with a thesis entitled Italy and Cyprus: Cross-Currents in Visual Culture (Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries). She has been an awardee of the British School at Rome and the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Harvard, and participated in the early-career research grant “Art of the Crusades: A Re-Evaluation,” led by the SOAS Institute and the Getty Foundation.

About the Research Project
News from a Medieval Commonwealth: Visual Culture in Southern Italy, Cyprus, and the Levant, c. 1200-1300

This cross-cultural, interdisciplinary project examines aspects of Byzantine art in the eastern Mediterranean during the thirteenth century through the scope of cultural translation theory. It brings together, for the first time, monumental painting, sculpture and archival sources to probe trans-cultural and trans-doctrinal visual idioms across the Levant and southern Italy. In particular, it investigates a cluster of churches belonging to an exiled female sisterhood originally based in Palestine who played a key role in the translation of Byzantine art and Islamic and western Christian visual languages into new artistic vocabularies. The project builds on my doctoral dissertation, which has established the existence of a visual-arts commonwealth, involving Cyprus, the Holy Land and former Byzantine themata in southern Italy in the thirteenth century .