Ioannis Stamos

Hannah Seeger Davis Postdocotral Research Fellow, 2020-2021

Degree
Ph.D., Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham, 2019
Dissertation
From Literary Criticism to Propaganda: Intellectuals, Culture, and Politics during the Metaxas Dictatorship (1936-1940)
Research Project
Culture and/as Politics: The Intellectuals and Ideology of the 4th-of-August Regime (1936-1941)

Yannis Stamos specializes in interwar Greek culture and politics, with an emphasis on literary criticism and far-right propaganda. He received his BA degree in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and his MRes and PhD in Modern Greek Studies from the University of Birmingham, UK. During his doctoral studies he also worked as a research assistant for the AHRC-funded project “The Cultural Politics of the Greek Crisis”. His publi-cations include articles on modern poetological poetry, literary criticism and politics. His cur-rent book project focuses on the interrelation of culture and politics during the Metaxas re-gime, seeking to furnish a comprehensive discussion of the dictatorship’s ideology and to ex-plore the legitimizing role of intellectuals and particularly literary critics.

About the Research Project
Culture and/as Politics: The Intellectuals and Ideology of the 4th-of-August Regime (1936-1941)

The research project explores the intersection of culture and politics, setting two main and largely interwoven aims. This intersection is crucial given that the regime’s main professed objective was the creation of the ‘Third Hellenic Civilization’, which was intricately related to culture and to the regime’s self-designation –and legitimization– as a Kulturstaat. One aim of the project is to demonstrate the political role of intellectuals and particularly those who pub-lished articles, reviews, and essays related to literature and culture during the dictatorship. The other aim consists in the presentation and reassessment of the regime’s ideology in its to-tality. Based on a large corpus of texts published during the ‘Fourth-of-August’ dictatorship, the project intends to showcase the alignment of a large segment of the Greek intelligentsia, and particularly literary critics, with the regime and their contribution to both the formation and the dissemination of its ideology. At the same time, it seeks to produce the first compre-hensive analysis of the dictatorship’s ideology while examining the intellectual genealogy of its components. Apart from continuities within Greece, the project seeks to point to interac-tions, dialogue, and commonalities with other countries (particularly Germany, Italy, France), and to the necessity for the Metaxas regime to be placed in a wider framework of a post-WWI New Right or even a fin-de-siècle and interwar brand of nationalist political modern-ism.