Katerina Panagopoulou

Katerina Panagopoulou

Visiting Fellow, Spring 2018

Affiliation
University of Crete
Research Project
Merging Networks: Innovation and Resistance to Changing Patterns of Exchange in Ancient Greece

Asst. Prof. Katerina Panagopoulou studied History and Archaeology at the University of Athens, Greece (1993) and obtained her PhD at the History Department at University College London in 2000 (supervisors: Prof. M.H.Crawford - Dr. A.Burnett, British Museum).  On a postdoctoral level, she has been a visiting research fellow at the Program for Hellenic studies at the University of Princeton in 2002 and a fellow at the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford in 2003, on a BSA/Foundation of the Hellenic World Fellowship.  She currently teaches Hellenistic and Roman History at the University of Crete and has taught at the Universities of Patrae, Corfu (Ionion) and at the Hellenic Open University.  She has also worked (as a Research Assistant) at the Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity / Hellenic Research Centre (1993-4) and at the Foundation of the Hellenic World (2000-2002). An enriched version of her PhD dissertation, currently entitled ‘The Early Antigonids: Coinage, Money and the Economy’, is under publication by the American Numismatic Society (New York).  She has also coedited (with Prof. I.Malkin and Dr. Christy Constantakopoulou) a collective volume entitled ‘Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean’, published by Routledge in 2009. Her research interests encompass ancient numismatics, the economic behaviour of precious metals (primarily silver and gold) in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, demography, politics and economy in Hellenistic and Roman Macedonia, Social Network Analysis and economic history, social history of the Hellenistic and Roman periods.

About the Research Project
Merging Networks: Innovation and Resistance to Changing Patterns of Exchange in Ancient Greece

‘Merging Networks: Innovation And Resistance To Changing Patterns of Exchange In Northern Greece‘ employs the so-called Social Network Analysis theory upon the exchange patterns of  transactions in Northern Greece during the Archaic and Classical periods, in order to understand the process of the selection and gradual adoption or imposition of the Attic monetary system by Philip II and by Alexander the Great upon local Thrakomakedonian markets.  Examining the extremely complicated pattern of transactions, which emerged in that region prior to king Philip II, will enable us to assess more accurately the impact upon local markets of the international financial policies fostered by the last two Makedonian kings of the Argead dynasty, Philip II and Alexander III (the Great). It is here argued that it was the explicit choice of these last two kings to join gradually the monetary convention known as the ‘Attic weight standard’ that restructured local markets and that simplified transactions in the region.