Lucio Del Corso

Lucio Del Corso

Visiting Fellow, Spring 2019

Affiliation
University of Cassino and Southern Lazio
Research Project
The Making of Greek Literary Culture in Hellenistic Egypt: The Papyrological Evidence

Lucio Del Corso (BA in Classics, Sapienza University of Rome; PhD in Textual and Manuscript Studies, University of Cassino) is associate professor in the University of Cassino and Southern Latium (Italy), where he teaches Papyrology and Classical Reception. He has previously taught at the University of Roma “Tor Vergata” and has been research associate and visiting academic at the Center for the Study of Ancient Documents – Oxford University. He joined several archaeological excavations, as epigraphist and papyrologist, and is now member of the Italian mission in Antinoupolis (Egypt). He is also the supervisor of the PSI-online project (www.psi-online.it), the main Italian digital resource for the study of Greek papyri. His research topics include Greek papyri and inscriptions, ancient school, reading and writing practices in the Greek world. He is the author of La lettura nel mondo ellenistico (Roma-Bari 2005) and of many contributions in books and journals, on several aspects of ancient Greek written heritage and literary culture.

About the Research Project
The Making of Greek Literary Culture in Hellenistic Egypt: The Papyrological Evidence

During the visit, I was able to revise and update the data set on relevant papyri, and to examine further evidence on the circumstances of the discovery of some on them; I focused especially on items found at the beginning of the 20th century, by German, French and American expeditions, which gave interesting details on the cultural life of Hellenistic Egypt. Moreover, I had the opportunity to browse Princeton collection of papyri, where I could identify some unpublished documents and literary texts, and to make a short visit to the Center for Tebtynis Papyri in the Bancroft Library (University of California), where I shortly worked on other Hellenistic papyri.

The core of my work was anyway the attempt to elaborate the key historical issues which the project intends to address: the social identity of book owners and readers; the interconnections between literary culture and Greek identity in marginal areas; the impact of such aspects on the complex mechanisms of text transmission of Greek literature. The opportunity of working in an international hub as the Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies, inside the unique scholarly environment of Princeton University, opened new, unattended perspectives for this.